It’s Presidents’ Day in the United States of America and what better way to celebrate than to demonstrate the hypocrisy of democracy?

Thousands of Americans are expected to take to the streets to protest America’s current sitting president, one Donald Trump.

That’s fine. I don’t have any problem with Americans exercising a freedom granted them by our Founding Fathers.

I do have a problem with the #NotMyPresident movement, though.

For any American out there who utters the phrase, “not my president”, or uses the hashtag #NotMyPresident, you are incorrect, and likely a hypocrite.

You are incorrect because you do not get to choose your president.

You are allowed to cast a vote for the man or woman you want to serve as your president, but the Electoral College ultimately determines who your president is, based on a collection of votes from every American who casts one.

Thus, you are likely a hypocrite because you celebrate the idea of democracy, exercise the freedoms given to you by our Constitution, and are supposedly fighting for the rights of every American…

…and yet you ignore the 63 million Americans who voted for Trump.

(Yes, Hillary Clinton received more votes, but if you want to argue that the popular vote should be the deciding factor in an election, that’s a separate argument for another day)

The point is, an election was held and your candidate lost. Don’t be a first-grader who runs inside and cries because the result didn’t go your way.

Like it or not, Trump was sworn in on January 20, 2017, and he is the President of the United States, and your president, too — assuming you are a legal American.

If you are not a legal American, you can be expecting a knock on your door soon as the Department of Homeland Security carries out its operation to crack down on illegal aliens.

So, go ahead and walk around and proclaim that Trump is not your president. I’ve got news for you, though … he is. And he will continue to be your president until you leave the country and become a citizen elsewhere, or until the next democratic general election in 2020 when you get another chance to vote him out of office.